‘Mystery’ continues one week after Malaysia airlines flight disappears

March 15, 2014 | By | Reply More

Mar 15, – Flight MH370 last communicated with air traffic control on March 8 east of Malaysia, and that area of the South China Sea between Malaysia and Vietnam initially was the focus of the search. Many experts assumed the plane had suffered a sudden catastrophic event because pilots didn’t alert ground control before it vanished from radar screens.

hromedia 'Mystery' continues one week after Malaysia airlines flight disappears intl. news2The disappearance of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 has generated dozens of theories on where it is now, from the Indian Ocean to the South China Sea, and how it vanished. Here’s a rundown of what we know and what we don’t, along with clues and theories about what happened to the Boeing 777 jetliner.

However, nothing was found there or farther north in the Gulf of Thailand. Within 18 hours, Malaysian authorities said they believed the plane may have tried to turn back, and search planes and vessels were sent to the Strait of Malacca, on the other side of Malaysia.

The search moved into the Indian Ocean on Friday after U.S. officials said the plane had sent signals to satellites for hours after its last contact with air traffic control. The U.S. Navy moved one of its ships in the Strait of Malacca. India ha said it is searching hundreds of small, uninhabited islands in the Andaman Sea more than 700 miles west of the plane’s last known position.

— SEISMIC REPORT: A Chinese university says it detected a seismic event in a “non-seismic zone” near the spot in the South China Sea where the plane lost contact with air traffic control. U.S. geologists said the event was a 2.8-magnitude earthquake off the coast of Indonesia, and said a quake resulting from a plane crash was improbable.

SIGNALS

The plane was sending out signals to a satellite, not unlike the way a cellphone tries to make contact with a base station even when it is off. That the plane was still sending out these messages for at least four hours after it was last spotted means it was still in one piece after it stopped communicating with the ground.

WHERE THE PLANE COULD HAVE BEEN: Experts believe the transmissions mean it was still in the air after it stopped communicating with air traffic control.

WHY SIGNALS STOPPED: A retired pilot and instructor for Boeing 777s says the plane has two transponders that emit radar data. Both can be shut off by simply turning a knob in the cockpit, keeping radar contact alive but removing key identifiers like air speed and altitude from air traffic controllers’ screens. Retired Capt. Ross Aimer says under normal circumstances, there’s no reason for a pilot to turn off the transponders.

Press journalist for HRO media – Ignacio Damigo contributed to this report.

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Category: International

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